Lutheran Worship and Resources



Traditional Lutheran worship services, using The Lutheran Hymnal and the KJV.

Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
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Thanksgiving Eve - 7 PM Central Time.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works asgregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Saturday, April 28, 2012

Jubilate - The Third Sunday after Easter, 2012.
John 16:16




Jubilate, The Third Sunday of Easter, 2012


Pastor Gregory L. Jackson




The Hymn #  536     Awake My Soul  3.28
The Confession of Sins
The Absolution
The Introit p. 16
The Gloria Patri
The Kyrie p. 17
The Gloria in Excelsis
The Salutation and Collect p. 19
The Epistle and Gradual        
The Gospel              
Glory be to Thee, O Lord!
Praise be to Thee, O Christ!
The Nicene Creed p. 22
The Sermon Hymn # 36     Now Thank We        3.40

No Man Takes Your Joy Away

The Communion Hymn # 354      In the Cross 3.84
The Preface p. 24
The Sanctus p. 26
The Lord's Prayer p. 27
The Words of Institution
The Agnus Dei p. 28
The Nunc Dimittis p. 29
The Benediction p. 31
The Hymn #231 We Now Implore                                    3.38 

THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER

Lord God, heavenly Father, who of Thy fatherly goodness dost suffer Thy children to come under Thy chastening rod here on earth, that we may be like unto Thine only-begotten Son in suffering and hereafter in glory: We beseech Thee, comfort us in temptations and afflictions by Thy Holy Spirit, that we may not fall into despair, but that we may continually trust in Thy Son's promise, that our trials will endure but a little while, and will then be followed by eternal joy; that we thus, in patient hope, may overcome all evil, and at last obtain eternal salvation, through the same, Thy Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Ghost, one true God, world without end. Amen.

KJV 1 Peter 2:11 Dearly beloved, I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul; 12 Having your conversation honest among the Gentiles: that, whereas they speak against you as evildoers, they may by your good works, which they shall behold, glorify God in the day of visitation. 13 Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme; 14 Or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well. 15 For so is the will of God, that with well doing ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men: 16 As free, and not using your liberty for a cloke of maliciousness, but as the servants of God. 17 Honour all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honour the king. 18 Servants, be subject to your masters with all fear; not only to the good and gentle, but also to the froward. 19 For this is thankworthy, if a man for conscience toward God endure grief, suffering wrongfully. 20 For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? but if, when ye do well, and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.

KJV John 16:16 A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the Father. 17 Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me: and, Because I go to the Father? 18 They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while? we cannot tell what he saith. 19 Now Jesus knew that they were desirous to ask him, and said unto them, Do ye enquire among yourselves of that I said, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me? 20 Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. 21 A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come: but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world. 22 And ye now therefore have sorrow: but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you. 23 And in that day ye shall ask me nothing. Verily, verily, I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you.





Sorrow and Joy


The Sundays after Easter are also the Sundays before Pentecost. We are taught from the Word about the change  - from His local public ministry to the global ministry of the Spirit through the Word and Sacraments.

This ministry continue and expanded, but it remained the same ministry – conveying Christ and His forgiveness to the world.
1.    In the Old Testament, the Messiah was promised, and people believed in Him, justified by faith.
2.    In the Gospels, Jesus taught and performed miracles, teaching people that righteousness came from faith in Him.
3.    After Pentecost, the apostles were given the mission to teach justification by faith, to offer grace through the Means of Grace, Word and Sacrament.

This lesson came from immediately after the Last Supper, when the disciples were sorrowful about the reality of Jesus’ suffering and death. Our need to be taught the same things repeatedly is clearly shown in the Gospels, where the disciples were taught many times about His suffering, death, and resurrection.

Lenski:
16) The return of Jesus to his Sender brings such an advantage to the disciples (v. 7) in the coming and the work of the Paraclete that joy instead of great sorrow should fill their hearts. Now Jesus adds the further comfort that the separation shall be for “a little while” only. We have the same connection in 14:16, 17, the promise of the Paraclete, and v. 18, 19, the promise of Jesus’ coming and of the disciples’ beholding him. A little while, and you no longer behold me; and again a little while, and you shall see me. The separation is to be short. The first “little while” embraces only a few hours, the afternoon of this very day (Friday); the second “little while” shall be equally short. The change in verbs, first “to behold” and then “to see,” is of no special import. However painful a separation may be, if its duration is short, that is great comfort indeed.
Lenski, R. C. H.: The Interpretation of St. John's Gospel. Minneapolis, MN : Augsburg Publishing House, 1961, S. 1093.

John 16:16 A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me, because I go to the Father. 17 Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me: and, Because I go to the Father?


This lesson repeats “a little while” so many times that Luther took note of it being a bit annoying. But it is characteristic of the Fourth Gospel and a good way to emphasize an answer to our impatience.

We grow impatient when difficulties seem to last forever, so that reminds us it will be “a little while.”

The disciples had enjoyed a time of great joy and wonder, with Jesus teaching them daily for three years, performing miracles and drawing enormous crowds. They knew the conflict was building because Thomas voiced his fear that they would all die when they went to help Lazarus.

Instead Lazarus was raised from the dead and a crowd followed them to Jerusalem, a crowd came out of the city to surround Him, and they heard Jesus hailed as the Messiah, the Son of David. When there is group excitement, everyone feels it. But that changed to sorrow quickly, and sorrow seems to last far longer than anyone can bear.

When the winter in New Ulm featured weeks of 60 below wind chill, a native said, “I can’t take this any longer.” It was so cold that the politicians had their hands in their own pockets. An older man said, “You can take and you will take it.” Soon the winter was over, but it was brutal at the time. I fed the birds and wrote a book.
Although weather seems minor in comparison, the trouble of the moment can seem to be overwhelming as it seems to stretch out into infinity.

But this lesson says, so many times, “a little while.”

Verse 17 – In retrospect, the “little while” seems to be very short. Jesus died on Good Friday and was away from the disciples a short time. But after He died on the cross, the interval between death and resurrection was painful, stretched out, seeming to last forever, as Jesus warned. But it was a little while.

This shows us the kindness and compassion of Jesus, supporting their growing faith and giving them a foundation when their world was shattered by His death as a criminal.

This also shows God’s compassion for us, because—like Peter and the disciples—we make vows that we can never keep. The Old Adam is still active, and we question God’s grace and goodness. The fake religions say this can never be, and they impress upon their disciples a concept of perfection plus a system of works in case they fail – they must work and suffer to atone for their own sins. This is either depressing or hardening, because the more sensitive realize they can never be perfect. The works-saints become certain of their sanctity, and often remind everyone of their exalted state.

Biblical psychology is the only true psychology – the study of the soul. The apostles, like us, showed their failings and needed the forgiveness of Christ.

18 They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while? we cannot tell what he saith. 19 Now Jesus knew that they were desirous to ask him, and said unto them, Do ye enquire among yourselves of that I said, A little while, and ye shall not see me: and again, a little while, and ye shall see me?

These two verses seem to repeated the previous ones, needlessly. But something else is happening. The verses are poetic repetition in the Hebraic style. That would relatively easy to teach people, with the same term used many times over. It is a type of catechism.

I noticed this when our granddaughter said, as a tiny little girl, “You have to wait.” I said to my wife, “I think she had heard that advice many times already.”

A little while – that gives people hope and keeps them from magnifying the problem. I tell students that college seems to be too long, but soon it will be foreshortened in their memories. The time will have seen to have rocketed by, but it is not so during the studies, when two or three more years seem like infinity.

20 Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy. 21 A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come: but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world.

A second principle of teaching is to use a concrete example, a picture to communicate the same point.

What does a little while mean, in terms of suffering and sorrow?

Answer – it is like childbirth. During labor, the time seems to last forever. There is often crying and always great physical stress. Of course, the emotional stress is also considerable – the worries, the hopes, the fears. Recently a pastor’s wife went through a difficult birth. She and the baby were both quite fragile. Everyone prayed for them as they slowly got stronger. It was quite worrisome for days. Then they both went home and there was great joy – and that baby will be especially treasured, and the mom too.

That congregation will always remember this little parable better because it is so personal. And so will the pastor and his family. “A little while of sorrow and pain” will have great meaning for them, because they experienced all the agonies of the wait.

22 And ye now therefore have sorrow: but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you.

We must always keep in mind that God allows these sorrows to happen. He protects us from many more. Today we met a woman with enormous medical bills and no coverage. We discussed the fact that Chris got superb coverage for free for several years, then Medicare at an early age with a decent supplement, then more plans. She seemed to be the trapeze artist who kept grabbing one more trapeze during a time great convulsions in the medical market. She worried over leaving a plan she liked in Phoenix, only to have much better care here in Arkansas. Pharmacies are a huge headache, but one opened up near our house, with great prices and personal care. Those are mundane details to show that one of the great fears of our age has been taken care of by One who is a good manager, with millennia of experience.

Sorrows can also mean loss of loved ones. This time on earth without them is very short. It seems long but it goes by in a blink. Heaven comes down to us in forgiveness and the promise of eternal life.





The greatest pains of the moment also include the opportunity for joy. In this last week we had conversations with four people who wanted to read Angel Joy and one who also received The Story of Jesus in Pictures and Wormhaven. Some people talk about going out to people, but we find the opportunities come to us, so we carry books in the car to give away. Each one has a single purpose – to convey the Gospel in some form. The books involve personal conversations about life and death issues, so they are more than brochures handed to the unwilling.

Ken Ham needs a $27 million museum to prove Creation to people, but a free book does the work with the Word of God.

In Paradise Lost, Milton says “The mind can make a heaven out of Hell, and a Hell out of heaven.” That is the difference between faith and unbelief. In faith, sorrows turn to joys. In unbelief, the greatest joys seem to be hellish. We spent a day with a wealthy man who could not get over his son having a minor defect – a cleft palate. He was a little boy filled with happiness and wonder, but the father could not experience that. He was in a hell he built for himself.



23 And in that day ye shall ask me nothing. Verily, verily, I say unto you, Whatsoever ye shall ask the Father in my name, he will give it you.

This verse is another example of Jesus building up our faith, then encouraging us to ask anything in His Name, in faith. He encourages us especially because He ends with this promise – Ask in My Name and He will give it to you.

Lenski:
And so Jesus once more tells how all their needs will be met. Amen, amen, I say to you, whatever you shall ask the Father he will give to you in my name. Compare 14:13, 14; 15:7 and 16; and on “amen,” etc., 1:51. Here the verb used is “to ask,” “to beg.” As regards the knowledge of the truth, neither asking nor inquiring will be necessary for the disciples, for the Spirit of the truth will attend to that of his own accord, 14:26; 16:13, 14. Jesus equipped his apostles completely in this respect, Acts 1:8. They will not inquire as Peter and John did in 13:24, etc.; as Peter alone did in 13:36, etc.; as Thomas did in 14:5, or Philip in 14:8, or Judas in 14:22; or as several would like to have done in 16:17, etc. The one inquiry just before his ascension in Acts 1:6 belongs with the others just listed, for the Spirit had not yet come. But as regards petitions of all kinds in all the exigencies of life, Jesus most definitely invites them.
Lenski, R. C. H.: The Interpretation of St. John's Gospel. Minneapolis, MN : Augsburg Publishing House, 1961, S. 1099.

Because of His human nature, Jesus understands our sorrows, needs, and fears. Because of His divine nature and sacrifice, God answers those prayers on behalf of the Son.

In the Gospel of John we find a special emphasis of the Father and Son relationship, witnessed by the Holy Spirit – the Threeness of the One God, the unity of the Three Persons.

Jesus was tempted, just as we are, but He did not sin. Knowing the temptations of our frail flesh – and emotions are the weakest of all – He has compassion on us. He does not let us be crushed by them, but lifts us up and encourages us.

Many people have asked for the quotation, and now the quotation with the graphic – that God does not necessarily take the sorrow from our heart, but our heart from the sorrow. He can turn it into such joy that we imagine we are in a garden of roses.

In that Photoshop I blended tornado wreckage with a rose garden. That is a metaphor. We lost two daughters, but their happiness and antics and love brighten each day as we remember them. We grieve for the pain and suffering of friends in the church at large, but we also have joy in sharing their experiences, in being friends.

This is an insight about prayer that someone mentioned a long time ago. When we pray for someone, we remember that person much better, even if we have never met. It creates a bond that overcomes the failings of human memory. When people join together, God does not simply get one memo signed by Christ, but many memos. As we experience those answers to prayer, our trust grows and fears diminish. We will need to have profound trust in the Word as the years go by and the next generation will too.

The trust earned by previous generations of church leaders has been squandered. Actions that would have had people riding out of town on a rail are now accepted and supported. Persecution is not from the outside for Americans, but from their own denominations.

Prayer is not the point of congregations – it is the natural consequence of justification by faith. Prayer is the fruit of faith. The congregation exists to create that faith through the Gospel and to sustain and deepen that faith in the Means of Grace.

Also, good works are the fruit of faith. They are not the purpose of the congregation but the natural consequence of justification by faith in Word and Sacrament. Christ teaches us to be faithful first, and His success will follow – with the cross.

Any gardener knows that an abundance of seed sown will produce an abundant harvest. There really was a Johny Appleseed, and he provided a remarkable example, creating orchards everywhere – thousands of apple trees. If a congregation that wants an abundant harvest, as judged by God alone, not by man, the people will sow the seed abundantly.





Quotations


"The nice, envious person who is sad when another prospers, and would
gladly have one eye less if thereby his neighbor had none, is the product of
Satan."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 102.

 "Here in this Gospel we see how the Lord comforts and imparts courage to His children whom He is about to leave behind Him, when they would come in fear and distress on account of His death or of their backsliding. We also notice what induced the evangelist John to use so many words that he indeed repeats one expression four times, which according to our thinking he might have epressed in fewer words."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 73f.

 "An example is here given us, which we should diligently lay hold of and take to heart; if it went with us as it did in the time of the apostles, that we should be in suffering, anxiety and distress, we should also remember to be strong and to rejoice because Christ will rise again."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 75.

"Therefore we must also feel within us this 'a little while' as the dear disciples felt it, for this is written for our example and instruction, so that we may thereby be comforted and be made better. And we should use this as a familiar adage among ourselves; yes, we should feel and experience it, so that we might at all times say, God is at times near and at times He has vanished out of sight. At times I remember how the Word seems neither to move me nor to apply to me. It passes by; I give no heed to it. But to this 'a little while' we must give heed and pay attention, so that we may remain strong and steadfast. We will experience the same as the disciples."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 75f.

"And although we do at times depart from the Word, we should not therefore remain altogether away from it, but return again, for He makes good His Word. Even though man cannot believe it, God will nevertheless help him to believe it, and this He does without man's reason or free will and without man adding anything thereto."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 76.

 "So very little does the free will and understanding of man know of the things pertaining to the salvation of the soul. These temporal things the free will can perceive and know, such as the cock crowing, which he can hear and his reason can also understand it; but when it is a question of understanding the work and Word of God, then human reason must give it up; it cannot make head or tail of it, although it pretends to understand a great deal about it. The gory thereof is too bright, the longer he beholds it the blinder he becomes."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 76f.

"We should take to heart and firmly hold fast to these words and keep them in mind when in sorrow and distress, that it will not last long, then we would also have more constant joy, for as Christ and His elect had their 'a little while,' so you and I and everyone will have his 'a little while.' Pilate and Herod will not crucify you, but in the same manner as the devil used them so he will also use your persecutors. Therefore when your trials come, you must not immediately think how you are to be delivered out of them. God will help you in due time. Only wait. It is only for a little while, He will not delay long."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 77.

[ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy] "This is spoken to all Christians, for every Christain must have temptations, trails, anxieties, adversities, sorrows, come what may. Therefore He mentions here no sorrow nor trial, He simply says they shall weep, lament, and be sorrowful, for the Christian has many persecutions. Some are suffering loss of goods; others there are whose character is suffering ignominy and scorn; some are drowned, others are burned; some are beheaded; one perishes in this manner, and another in that; it is therefore the lot of the Christian constantly to suffer misfortune, persecution, trials and adversity. This is the rod or fox tail with which they are punished. They dare not look for anything better as long as they are here. This is the court color by which the Christian is recognized,and if anyone wants to be a Christian, he dare not be ashamed of his court color or livery."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 79.

 "Why does God do this and permit His own to be persecuted and hounded? In order to suppress and subdue the free will, so that it may not seek an expedient in their works; but rather become a fool in God's works and learn thereby to trust and depend upon God alone."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 79f.

 [woman in travail] This parable of the woman is a strong and stubborn argument against free will, that it is entirely powerless and without strength in the things pertaining to the salvation of our souls. The Gospel shows very plainly that divine strength and grace are needed. Man's free will is entirely too weak and insignificant to accomplish anything here. But we have established our own orders and regulations instead of the Gospel and through these we want to free ourselves from sin, from death, from hell, and from all misfortune and finally be saved thereby. A great mistake."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 81.

[woman in travail] "The woman is here in such a state of mind that she is fearful of great danger, and yet she knows that the whole work lies in the hands of God; in Him she trusts; upon Him it is she depends; He also helps her and accomplishes the work, which the whole world could not do, and she thinks of nothing but the time that shall follow, when she shall again rejoice; and her heart feels and says, A dangerous hour is at hand, but afterwards it will be well. Courage and the heart press through all obstacles. Thus it will also be with you, when you are in sorrow and adversity, and when you become new creatures. Only quietly wait and permit God to work. He will accomplish everything without your assistance."
            Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 81.

[woman in travail] ..."but wait thou patiently and permit God to do with you according to His will. He shall accomplish it; permit Him to work. We shall accomplish nothing ourselves, but at times we shall feel death and hell. This the ungodly shall also feel, but they do not believe that God is present in it and wants to help them. Just as the woman here accomplishes nothing, she only feels pain, distress and misery; but she cannot help herself out of this state."
Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 82.


John 16:20 - "Such people, however, do not understand divine things, they think they will suddenly enter death with Christ, whom they have never learned to know except in words. Thus was Peter also disposed, but he stood before Christ like a rabbit before one beating a drum. Notice, how the old Adam lacks courage when under the cross! The new man, however, can indeed persevere through grace."
Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols., III,  p. 85.


"In suffering pious persons have no aim of their own, but if it be God's will they bear good fruit like the tree planted by streams of water; and that is pleasing to God, and besides all presumption is condemned, all show and every excuse however good they may be. But he who battles heroically will receive for his suffering here joy, the eternal in place of the temporal. Of this Christ says: 'Your joy will be turned into sorrow.'"
Sermons of Martin Luther, 8 vols.,
III,  p. 86.

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