Lutheran Worship and Resources



Traditional Lutheran worship services, using The Lutheran Hymnal and the KJV.

Norma Boeckler, Artist-in-Residence

The Lutheran Library Publishing Ministry

Bethany Lutheran Worship on
Ustream - Sunday, 10 AM Central.


Thanksgiving Eve - 7 PM Central Time.

Saved worship files and Greek lessons are at the live worship link.

email: greg.jackson.edlp@gmail.com,
which works asgregjacksonedlp@gmail.com too.

Luther's Sermons, Lenker Series
Book of Concord Selections
Martin Chemnitz Press Books

Norma A. Boeckler Author's Page

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson's Author's Page

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Palm Sunday




The Last Supper, by Norma Boeckler

Palm Sunday, The Sixth Sunday in Lent

Pastor Gregory L. Jackson

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/bethany-lutheran-worship

Bethany Lutheran Worship, 8 AM Phoenix Time

The Good Friday service will be at 6 PM.

The Hymn #160 All Glory Laud and Honor 4.49
The Confession of Sins
The Absolution
The Introit p. 16
The Gloria Patri
The Kyrie p. 17
The Gloria in Excelsis
The Salutation and Collect p. 19
The Epistle and Gradual Philippians 2:5-11
The Gospel Matthew 21:1-9
Glory be to Thee, O Lord!
Praise be to Thee, O Christ!
The Nicene Creed p. 22
The Sermon Hymn #162 Ride On 4.80

The Crowds Who Met and Followed Him

The Hymn #305 Soul Adorn Thyself 4.23
The Preface p. 24
The Sanctus p. 26
The Lord's Prayer p. 27
The Words of Institution
The Agnus Dei p. 28
The Nunc Dimittis p. 29
The Benediction p. 31
The Hymn #370 My Faith Is Built 3.11

KJV Philippians 2:5 Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 6 Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 7 But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 8 And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. 9 Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: 10 That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; 11 And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

KJV Matthew 21:1 And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples, 2 Saying unto them, Go into the village over against you, and straightway ye shall find an ass tied, and a colt with her: loose them, and bring them unto me. 3 And if any man say ought unto you, ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them; and straightway he will send them. 4 All this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, 5 Tell ye the daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass. 6 And the disciples went, and did as Jesus commanded them, 7 And brought the ass, and the colt, and put on them their clothes, and they set him thereon. 8 And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way. 9 And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest.

Palm Sunday
Almighty and everlasting God, who hast caused Thy beloved Son to take our nature upon Himself, that He might give all mankind the example of humility and suffer death upon the cross for our sins: Mercifully grant us a believing knowledge of this, and that, following the example of His patience, we may be made partakers of the benefits of His sacred passion and death, through the same, Thy beloved Son, Jesus Christ, our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Ghost, one true God, world without end. Amen.

The Crowds Who Met and Followed Him

On the day we call Palm Sunday, crowds came out of Jerusalem to greet Jesus as the Messiah, and crowds followed him from Bethany.

There was a reason, supplied by John.

KJV John 12:9 Much people of the Jews therefore knew that he was there: and they came not for Jesus' sake only, but that they might see Lazarus also, whom he had raised from the dead. 10 But the chief priests consulted that they might put Lazarus also to death; 11 Because that by reason of him many of the Jews went away, and believed on Jesus.

Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, and Lazarus was a prominent citizen. We know that because he had a grave carved from stone, like Jesus’ future grave. That was the mark of a wealthy man.

So Lazarus was known already for being prominent, but even more for being raised from the dead. He was a living witness to Jesus being the Messiah the Son of God.

KJV John 12:12 On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem, 13 Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord. 14 And Jesus, when he had found a young ass, sat thereon; as it is written, 15 Fear not, daughter of Sion: behold, thy King cometh, sitting on an ass's colt. 16 These things understood not his disciples at the first: but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that these things were written of him, and that they had done these things unto him. 17 The people therefore that was with him when he called Lazarus out of his grave, and raised him from the dead, bare record.

John 12:18 For this cause the people also met Him, for that they heard that He had done this miracle. 19 The Pharisees therefore said among themselves, Perceive ye how ye prevail nothing? behold, the world is gone after him.

So we can see that Palm Sunday was a miraculous procession, with the story of Lazarus being proclaimed and Jesus hailed as the promised Messiah. The religious leaders saw His popularity and plotted against Him. The secular leaders naturally feared a Messiah, a King of the Jews followed by an enormous crowd.

Every government fears a general insurrection, and nothing is more powerful behind a revolt than one based upon religion. One of the famous wars happened less than 40 years later, when a small battle turned into the Jewish revolt, a massive siege against Jerusalem, and the utter destruction of Herod’s Temple.

John’s Gospel shows us why Jesus was a dual-threat, to the Jewish leaders and to the Roman occupiers.

Lenski made this point in his commentary about John’s Gospel. The Fourth Gospel assumes the reader knows Matthew, Mark, and Luke. So the Apostle John unites the Gospels into one by adding supplemental material and the sermons, by not repeating what is already well known and fully described.

I recall one skeptic saying he believed what John and Paul said about the Virgin Birth, and neither one mentioned it. That is a good case of injecting one’s opinion into a text and making silence say the opposite of what is intended. Paul and John did not discuss matters beyond debate but addressed the spiritual topics needed by their audiences. Many theological books mention one area of the faith but not others, but that does not mean they are rejecting what is not mentioned. One can hardly imagine an argument more juvenile than one from silence.

So some also try to say that Jesus did not consider Himself the Messiah, the Son of God. The Gospel accounts are relatively quiet about Messianic claims, but consider the opposite. What kind of person says he is the Messiah all the time? – a madman! Jesus clearly taught His role but did not read from a theological textbook to do that. He did not have to make claims often when He turned water into wine, still the storm, walked on water, multiplied the loaves, healed the sick, and raised the dead.

The ministry of Christ, His human nature and divine nature, are perfectly described in the great Philippians passage for this Sunday:

KJV Philippians 2:1 If there be therefore any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any bowels and mercies, 2 Fulfil ye my joy, that ye be likeminded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. 3 Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves. 4 Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.

The four verses of introduction are a beautiful expression of how we should live as believers. “Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory, but in Christ-like humility.” Instead of being self-involved, be considerate of others.

The foundation for this behavior is stated in verses 5-11. It is the Gospel. When we consider this passage, we should remember how it transcends all human efforts to achieve the same results, for no one could really object to the goals of the first four verses. Many people would call them Utopian, idealistic, and impossible. But the apostle bases his admonitions upon one thing only – the Gospel of forgiveness and what Jesus Christ did for us on the cross.

Many human books can smash us with the Law, but only the Gospel can comfort us and put us at peace. Man-made books tell us why we should behave in a certain way, and it is always connected to something beneficial. It is good for society, or for the family, or for inner happiness. But the Holy Spirit teaches us in a different way. God does not even place conditions on this. He does not say, “If your family is good to you,” or “If you want to get along at work,” or “If you want to get ahead.” This passage stands by itself even if someone is living in a Marxist dictatorship, in great wealth, or in the most miserable family. Whatever is done is faith glorifies God. Whatever is done without faith is a sin.

Therefore, this Gospel message has the power to create faith in an unbeliever, to strengthen our faith, and to encourage us to please God.

What was the mind of Christ?

The eternal Son of God, the creating Word at the Creation, accepted the state of humiliation when He lived among us as a mere man. Obviously He was never just a man but remained God-in-the-flesh. However, He allowed Himself to be regarded as a man and treated as an ordinary man most of the time. Whenever something happened, it was because Jesus allowed it to happen.

For instance, when the crowd tried to make Jesus a king, He refused. Likewise, when they wanted to kill Him, before His time, He passed through the crowd (indicating very clearly that His divine nature was not limited by His human body and nature). That is why the orthodox theologians write about Jesus’ state of humiliation. He accepted a lowly state, giving us an example of how we should live.

When we would have been tempted to flash our divinity frequently, if we had been in the same situation, Jesus took on the appearance of a slave (as the text says literally). It is worth remembering that Luther called John the Baptist the greatest prophet of all, because John said “This ordinary looking man is the Messiah.” It is far easier to believe in a glorious Messiah not yet seen than to look at a man standing there, someone known in the community, and say, “This is the promised Christ.”

So it was very difficult for Jesus to carry out His ministry, knowing all and moving toward His crucifixion, and yet to teach from day to day and be viewed as a man, as an enemy to His people (according to the religious leaders).

8 And being found in fashion as a man,
he humbled himself,
and became obedient unto death,
even the death of the cross.

We should never imagine that it was easy for Jesus to accept the cross because of His divine nature. It was all the more humiliating to have His own people first cheer Him and then yell crucify Him, jeering at Him on the cross. Nevertheless, Jesus accepted this role, because He knew He would died on the cross for the sins of the world. Only God Incarnate could die on the cross. Only the perfect Son of God could atone for my sins and for yours.

God exalted Jesus, just as He will exalt every humble believer who serves Him with the mind of Christ.

Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him,
and given him a name
which is above every name:
10 That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,
of things in heaven,
and things in earth,
and things under the earth;
11 And that every tongue should confess that
Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

When believers are brought low by being faithful to the Word, they should remember this entire passage. The Word brings the Cross. The perfect Son of Man was not spared. All of us, who are sinners, will do no better. And even though our Old Adam rebels against bearing the cross, it brings us closer to Christ to know that whatever we might suffer is nothing compared to what He has done for us.

When I was a teen, most of my classmates were Lutheran. The entire class cheered once when Luther’s name was mentioned in history class. I was not Lutheran at the time. I was amazed that my friends had gone to classes for three years on Saturdays to be confirmed. In the Lutheran congregation I joined, every student had already memorized the catechism before starting confirmation, following what the Book of Concord says about Luther’s Small Catechism – the Head of the Household will teach in a simple way to his household. I was especially impressed because the confirmed students knew so much about the Bible and Luther.

When I left the LCA as a pastor, I still had two year confirmation classes. My colleagues adopted camp-firmation, a week of summer camp followed by confirmation. One can only guess how little education took place.

No one should think that confirmation is the equivalent of a Ph.D. in theology. Whether someone is confirmed with a smattering of knowledge or as an expert, the real challenge is to constantly remain attentive to the Word and willing to learn. Dr. Martin Luther was the greatest theologian of the Christian Church, with a genius IQ, having a knowledge of the Bible which staggers us today. Nevertheless, he also studied the catechism all the time. We can never know the basics well enough.

Some pastors never study again after leaving seminary. Some pursue graduate studies and then stop studying. Luther said that pastors who do not remain diligent in the Word should be “chased out of town and pelted with dog manure.” I have no hesitation in quoting him, because his comments are included in the introduction to the Large Catechism. We subscribe to the Large Catechism as a correct exposition of the Word.

The greatest blessing of doctrinal controversy, whether big or small, is becoming more certain of the Word. I recall many experiences where people questioned whether an infant could have faith. I knew what the Scriptures said, but I knew it far better when those ideas were under attack, sometimes by innocent people raised among the Baptists. This Gospel is a good example of how infant faith (and therefore infant baptism) is taught, a few verses later.

Matthew 21:15-16 (KJV) And when the chief priests and scribes saw the wonderful things that he did, and the children crying in the temple, and saying, Hosanna to the son of David; they were sore displeased, {16} And said unto him, Hearest thou what these say? And Jesus saith unto them, Yea; have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected praise?

How can a baby, a nursing child, lack faith while praising Christ? Maybe the babies did not say Halleluiah, but certainly their faces lit up when Jesus came by. A child’s face will change the moment it hears its mother’s or father’s voice. And siblings – they can make a baby laugh without the slightest effort. That shows trust in people, so trust in God cannot be so great an effort.

Infant faith and infant baptism need to be affirmed in an era where people say, “All you need is Jesus,” but they deny and reject the Means of Grace, which are the appointed instruments to obtain what the Scriptures promise.

Luther: "True, the enthusiasts confess that Christ died on the cross and saved us; but they repudiate that by which we obtain Him; that is, the means, the way, the bridge, the approach to Him they destroy...They lock up the treasure which they should place before us and lead me a fool's chase; they refuse to admit me to it; they refuse to transmit it; they deny me its possession and use." (III, 1692)
The. Engelder, W. Arndt, Th. Graebner, F. E. Mayer, Popular Symbolics, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1934, p. 5.

That is why I cannot go to a Baptist for spiritual wisdom, even though many are friends or students. A Baptist religion teacher is always going to deny one of the most basic Christian doctrines – baptismal regeneration (rebirth). That is another way of saying that the Word is not effective, since it is the Word not water that makes Holy Baptism powerful.

A Baptist religion teacher is going to direct people away from the Word and Sacraments to make a decision for Christ. That simply supplants the foundation of faith. No wonder that Baptists often become so liberal they are hard to distinguish from Unitarians. One Baptism minister I knew even talked about “the continuing revelation of the Holy Spirit.” He meant the Scriptures have a different content for each generation.

But some will say, “Aha. The ELCA is as left-wing as they come, and they are supposedly Lutheran. How can you blame that on the Baptists.”

I can.

The key change took place when the measure of sensitivity came from an interpretation of the “Kingdom of God.” The Social Gospel Movement (which promoted socialism, not being social) interpreted the Kingdom of God as the visible church becoming a political advocate and changing or redeeming society. The leader best remembered for this was Walter Rauschenbusch. In his famous lectures at Yale, The Social Gospel, he reinterpreted the doctrines of Christianity to mean the opposite of what they said. For example, when Jesus died on the cross, it was to show solidarity with the poor. (Solidarity is a favorite term with the labor movement.)

Rauschenbusch became the litmus test for all mainline denominational leaders, including Lutherans. Those who liked him and quoted him were rewarded. It really meant repeated the religious terms and meaning the opposite, something the insiders knew.

The theologian loved by the Church Growth Movement is Karl Barth, who was Reformed. He was a notorious adulterer but he was even more unfaithful with the Word. He also did the same thing will all religious terms. He imparted his new meaning to all the terms, and all Barthians knew what they others meant when they used Christian terms to say exactly the opposite of what people thought.

Baptists, like the Reformed, rely heavily on rationalism. By saying the Word itself has no power, they make claims to impart power by the way they present this powerless Word. Sometimes they acknowledge a little, but overall they jump at every chance to reject the Means of Grace.

So today – how does Jesus come to us?

In the Word. The Word of God—spoken, taught, preached, sung in hymns, confessed in Creeds—conveys Christ and His forgiveness to us.

How do we know we are forgiven all our sins?

First the absolution declares this in the Name of Christ.

Secondly, the liturgy, hymns, and sermon teach this Promise of God.

Thirdly, Holy Communion makes this instrument of grace visible to us and individual for each one of us. This comes to us through the Divine Word, not through human effort, virtue, and reason.

"For let me tell you this, even though you know it perfectly and be already master in all things, still you are daily in the dominion of the devil, who ceases neither day nor night to steal unawares upon you, to kindle in your heart unbelief and wicked thoughts against the foregoing and all the commandments. Therefore you must always have God's Word in your heart, upon your lips, and in your ears. But where the heart is idle, and the Word does not sound, he breaks in and has done the damage before we are aware. On the other hand, such is the efficacy of the Word, whenever it is seriously contemplated, heard, and used, that it is bound never to be without fruit, but always awakens new understanding, pleasure, and devoutness, and produces a pure heart and pure thoughts. For these words are not inoperative or dead, but creative, living words."
The Large Catechism, #100, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 609.
Efficacy of the Word

(1) (1) "An aweful mystery is here To challenge faith and waken fear: The Savior comes as food divine, Concealed in earthly bread and wine. (2) This world is loveless--but above, What wondrous boundlessness of love! The King of Glory stoops to me My spirit's life and strength to be. (3) In consecrated wine and bread No eye perceives the mystery dread; But Jesus' words are strong and clear: 'My body and My blood are here.' (4) How dull are all the powers of sense Employed on proofs of love immense! The richest food remains unseen, And highest gifts appear--how mean! (5) But here we have no boon on earth, And faith alone discerns its worth. The Word, not sense, must be our guide, And faith assure since sight's denied."
Matthias Loy, 1880, "An Aweful Mystery Is Here" The Lutheran Hymnal, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1941, Hymn #304. 1 Corinthians 11:23.

"So confident now should every preacher be, and not doubt, that possesses and preaches God's Word, that he could even die for it, since it is worth life to us. Now there is no man so holy that he needs to die for the doctrine he has taught concerning himself. Therefore one concludes from this that the apostles had assurance from God that their Gospel was God's Word. And here is is also proved that the Gospel is nothing else than the preaching of Christ."
Martin Luther, Commentary on Peter and Jude, ed. John N. Lenker, Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 1990, p. 245. 2 Peter 1:16-18.

"Besides, it is an exceedingly effectual help against the devil, the world, and the flesh and all evil thoughts to be occupied with the Word of God, and to speak of it, and meditate upon it, so that the First Psalm declares those blessed who meditate upon the Law of God day and night. Undoubtedly, you will not start a stronger incense or other fumigation against the devil than by being engaged upon God's commandments and words, and speaking, singing, or thinking of them. For this is indeed the true holy water and holy sign from which he flees, and by which he may be driven away."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #10, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, J-110 p. 570f.

"Now, for this reason alone you ought gladly to read, speak, think and treat of these things, if you had no other profit and fruit from them than that by doing so you can drive away the devil and evil thoughts. For he cannot hear or endure God's Word; and God's Word is not like some other silly prattle, as that about Dietrich of Berne, etc., but as St. Paul says, Romans 1:16, the power of God which gives the devil burning pain, and strengthens, comforts, and helps us beyond measure."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #11, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 002 p. 571 Romans 1:16.

"And what need is there of many words? If I were to recount all the profit and fruit which God's Word produces, whence would I get enough paper and time? The devil is called the master of a thousand arts. But what shall we call God's Word, which drives away and brings to naught this master of a thousand arts with all his arts and power? It must indeed be the master of more than a hundred thousand arts. And shall we frivolously despise such power, profit, strength, and fruit--we, especially, who claim to be pastors and preachers? If so, we should not only have nothing given us to eat, but be driven out, being baited with dogs, and pelted with dung, because we not only need all this every day as we need our daily bread, but must also daily use it against the daily and unabated attacks and lurking of the devil, the master of a thousand arts."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #12, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 003 p. 571. Chapter 4.

"Since, therefore, so much depends upon God's Word that without it no holy day can be sanctified, we must know that God insists upon a strict observance of this commandment, and will punish all who despise His Word and are not willing to hear and learn it, especially at the time appointed for the purpose."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #95, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 007 p. 607. Exodus 20:8-11.

"Note, therefore, that the force and power of this commandment lies not in the resting, but in the sanctifying, so that to this day belongs a special holy exercise. For other works and occupations are not properly called holy exercises, unless the man himself be first holy. But here a work is to be done by which man is himself made holy, which is done (as we have heard) alone through God's Word. For this, then, fixed places, times, persons, and the entire external order of worship have been created and appointed, so that it may be publicly in operation."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #94, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 006 p. 607. Exodus 20:8-11.

"On the contrary, any observance or work that is practised without God's Word is unholy before God, no matter how brilliantly it may shine, even though it be covered with relics, such as the fictitious spiritual orders, which know nothing of God's Word and seek holiness in their own works."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #93, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 005 p. 607. Exodus 20:8-11.

"For the Word of God is the sanctuary above all sanctuaries, yea, the only one which we Christians know and have. For though we had the bones of all the saints or all holy and consecrated garments upon a heap, still that would help us nothing; for all that is a dead thing which can sanctify nobody. But God's Word is the treasure which sanctifies everything, and by which even all the saints themselves were sanctified. At whatever hour, then, God's Word is taught, preached, heard, read or meditated upon, there the person, day, and work are sanctified thereby, not because of the external work, but because of the Word, which makes saints of us all. Therefore I constantly say that all our life and work must be ordered according to God's Word, if it is to be God-pleasing or holy. Where this is done, this commandment is in force and being fulfilled."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #91-2, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 004 p. 607. Exodus 20:8-11.

"For these words are not inoperative or dead, but creative, living words. And even though no other interest or necessity impel us, yet this ought to urge every one thereunto, because thereby the devil is put to flight and driven away, and, besides, this commandment is fulfilled, and [this exercise in the Word] is more pleasing to God than any work of hypocrisy, however brilliant."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #102, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 012 p. 609. Exodus 20:8-11.

"For let me tell you this, even though you know it perfectly and be already master in all things, still you are daily in the dominion of the devil, who ceases neither day nor night to steal unawares upon you, to kindle in your heart unbelief and wicked thoughts against the foregoing and all the commandments. Therefore you must always have God's Word in your heart, upon your lips, and in your ears. But where the heart is idle, and the Word does not sound, he breaks in and has done the damage before we are aware. On the other hand, such is the efficacy of the Word, whenever it is seriously contemplated, heard, and used, that it is bound never to be without fruit, but always awakens new understanding, pleasure, and devoutness, and produces a pure heart and pure thoughts."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #100-1, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 011 p. 609. Exodus 20:8-11.

"Likewise those fastidious spirits are to be reproved who, when they have heard a sermon or two, find it tedious and dull, thinking that they know all that well enough, and need no more instruction. For just that is the sin which has been hitherto reckoned among mortal sins, and is called akedia, i. e., torpor or satiety, a malignant, dangerous plague with which the devil bewitches and deceives the hearts of many, that he may surprise us and secretly withdraw God's Word from us."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #99, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 010 p. 609. Exodus 20:8-11.

"Know, therefore, that you must be concerned not only about hearing, but also about learning and retaining it in memory, and do not think that it is optional with you of no great importance, but that it is God's commandment, who will require of you how you have heard, learned, and honored His Word."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #98, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 009 p. 609. Exodus 20:8-11.

"Therefore not only those sin against this commandment who grossly misuse and desecrate the holy day, as those who on account of their greed or frivolity neglect to hear God's Word or lie in taverns and are dead drunk like swine; but also that other crowd, who listen to God's Word as to any other trifle, and only from custom come to preaching, and go away again, and at the end of the year know as little of it as at the beginning. For hitherto the opinion prevailed that you had properly hallowed Sunday when you had heard a mass or the Gospel read; but no one cared for God's Word, as also no one taught it. Now, while we have God's Word, we nevertheless do not correct the abuse; we suffer ourselves to be preached to and admonished, but we listen without seriousness and care."
The Large Catechism, Preface, #96-7, The Third Commandment, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, 008 p. 609. Exodus 20:8-11.

"For let me tell you this, even though you know it perfectly and be already master in all things, still you are daily in the dominion of the devil, who ceases neither day nor night to steal unawares upon you, to kindle in your heart unbelief and wicked thoughts against the foregoing and all the commandments. Therefore you must always have God's Word in your heart, upon your lips, and in your ears. But where the heart is idle, and the Word does not sound, he breaks in and has done the damage before we are aware. On the other hand, such is the efficacy of the Word, whenever it is seriously contemplated, heard, and used, that it is bound never to be without fruit, but always awakens new understanding, pleasure, and devoutness, and produces a pure heart and pure thoughts. For these words are not inoperative or dead, but creative, living words."
The Large Catechism, #100, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 609.

"Therefore it is not a Christian Church either; for where Christ is not preached, there is no Holy Ghost who creates, calls, and gathers the Christian Church, without which no one can come to Christ our Lord. Let this suffice concerning the sum of this article."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #45, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 689.

"For where He does not cause it to be preached and made alive in the heart, so that it is understood, it is lost, as was the case under the Papacy, where faith was entirely put under the bench, and no one recognized Christ as his Lord or the Holy Ghost as his Sanctifier, that is, no one believed that Christ is our Lord in the sense that He has acquired this treasure for us, without our works and merit, and made us acceptable to the Father. What, then, was lacking? This, that the Holy Ghost was not there to reveal it and cause it to be preached; but men and evil spirits were there, who taught us to obtain grace and be saved by our works."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #43-44, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 689.

"For, in the first place, He [the Holy Ghost] has a peculiar congregation in the world, which is the mother that begets and bears every Christian through the Word of God, which He reveals and preaches, [and through which] He illumines and enkindles hearts, that they understand, accept it, cling to it, and persevere in it."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #42, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 689.

"For neither you nor I could ever know anything of Christ, or believe on Him, and obtain Him for our Lord, unless it were offered to us and granted to our hearts by the Holy Ghost through the preaching of the Gospel. The work is done and accomplished; for Christ has acquired and gained the treasure for us by His suffering, death, resurrection, etc. But if the work remained concealed so that no one knew of it, then it would be in vain and lost. That this treasure, therefore, might not lie buried, but be appropriated and enjoyed, God has caused the Word to go forth and be proclaimed, in which He gives the Holy Ghost to bring this treasure home and appropriate it to us. Therefore sanctifying is nothing else than bringing us to Christ to receive this good, to which could not attain ourselves."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #38, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 689.

"For now we are only half pure and holy, so that the Holy Ghost has ever [some reason why] to continue His work in us through the Word, and daily to dispense forgiveness, until we attain to that life where there will be no more forgiveness, but only perfectly pure and holy people, full of godliness and righteousness, removed and free from sin, death, and all evil, in a new, immortal, and glorified body."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #58, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693.

"But outside of this Christian Church, where the Gospel is not, there is no forgiveness, as also there can be no holiness [sanctification]. Therefore all who seek and wish to merit holiness [sanctification], not through the Gospel and forgiveness of sin, but by their works, have expelled and severed themselves [from this Church]."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #56, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693.

"Everything, therefore, in the Christian Church is offered to the end that we shall daily obtain there nothing but the forgiveness of sin through the Word and signs, to comfort and encourage our consciences as long as we live here. Thus, although we have sins, the [grace of the] Holy Ghost does not allow them to injure us, because we are in the Christian Church, where there is nothing but [continuous, uninterrupted] forgiveness of sin, both in that God forgives us, and in that we forgive, bear with, and help each other."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #55, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693.

"We further believe that in this Christian Church we have forgiveness of sin, which is wrought through the holy Sacraments and Absolution, moreover, through all manner of consolatory promises of the entire Gospel. Therefore, whatever is to be preached, concerning the Sacraments belongs here, and in short, the whole Gospel and all the offices of Christianity, which also must be preached and taught without ceasing. For although the grace of God is secured through Christ, and sanctification is wrought by the Holy Ghost through the Word of God in the unity of the Christian Church, yet on account of our flesh which we bear about with us we are never without sin."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #54, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693.

"I am also a part and member of the same, a sharer and joint owner of all the goods it possesses, brought to it and incorporated into it by the Holy Ghost by having heard and continuing to hear the Word of God, which is the beginning of entering it. For formerly, before we had attained to this, we were altogether of the devil, knowing nothing of God and of Christ. Thus, until the last day, the Holy Ghost abides with the holy congregation or Christendom, by means of which He fetches us to Christ and which He employs to teach and preach to us the Word, whereby He works and promotes sanctification, causing it [this community] daily to grow and become strong in the faith and its fruits which He produces."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #53, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693.

"Behold, all this is to be the office and work of the Holy Ghost, that He begin and daily increase holiness upon earth by means of these two things, the Christian Church and the forgiveness of sin. But in our dissolution He will accomplish it altogether in an instant, and will forever preserve us therein by the last two parts."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #59, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 693f.

"Therefore we believe in Him who through the Word daily brings us into the fellowship of this Christian Church, and through the same Word and the forgiveness of sins bestows, increases, and strengthens faith, in order that when He has accomplished it all, and we abide therein, and die to the world and to all evil, He may finally make us perfectly and forever holy; which now we expect in faith through the Word."
The Large Catechism, The Creed, Article III, #62, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 695.

"If we would be Christians, therefore, we must surely expect and reckon upon having the devil with all his angels and the world as our enemies, who will bring every possible misfortune and grief upon us. For where the Word of God is preached, accepted, or believed, and produces fruit, there the holy cross cannot be wanting. And let no one think that he shall have peace; but he must risk whatever he has upon earth--possessions, honor, house and estate, wife and children, body and life. Now, this hurts our flesh and the old Adam; for the test is to be steadfast and to suffer with patience in whatever way we are assailed, and to let go whatever is taken from us."
Large Catechism, The Lord's Prayer, Third Petition, #65, Concordia Triglotta, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1921, p. 715.





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